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The Making of SRAM XG-1199 (XX1) 11sp X-Dome/Glide cassette, 10-42t

by on Sep.27, 2013, under Uncategorized

IMG 0867 150x150 The Making of SRAM XG 1199 (XX1) 11sp X Dome/Glide cassette, 10 42t

SRAM XG-1199 (XX1) 11sp X-Dome/Glide cassette, 10-42t

IMG 0868 150x150 The Making of SRAM XG 1199 (XX1) 11sp X Dome/Glide cassette, 10 42t

SRAM XG-1199 (XX1) 11sp X-Dome/Glide cassette, 10-42t

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Titanium Fat Bike

by on Sep.12, 2013, under Customers Bikes, Uncategorized

New Image 150x150 Titanium Fat Bike

Titanium Fat Bike

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Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 9070 11 speed groupset

by on Aug.16, 2013, under Uncategorized

The luxury groupset shares a crankset, chain and brakes with the 9000 11-speed mechanical group but weighs 24g less. Total group weight is 2,047g, compared to 2,219g for the previous Dura-Ace Di2.

The 9070 derailleurs get a visual overhaul from the 7970 ones, with some slight weight savings, and the rear now accepts up to a 28T cassette.

The big weight savings compared to 7970 comes from the internal battery, with its minimal mounting hardware compared to the external battery. There’s still an external battery option for 9070
By Ben Delaney
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Want to shift 10 gears with the push of a button, with your hands on the tops of the bars, wrapped around the drops or at the end of clip-on extensions? With the new Dura-Ace Di2 9070 you can do that – plus shift with the buttons on the actual levers, of course.

Pros: Fast, flawless shifting; four satellite shifter options; programmable shift speed and configurations; excellent braking power and modulation
Cons: Software required to program system is PC only; not entirely backwards compatible; faint tactile sensation when shifting
Bottom line: A luxury group that underscores the limitations of mechanical systems, adding a plethora of shifting options, from button location to shifting under full power

First announced last year, Shimano’s latest electronic groupset, Dura-Ace Di2 9070 is now showing up on bikes. BikeRadar tested the 11-speed modular group on a Scott Foil outside of San Diego, California.

Video: Shimano Di2 Dura-Ace 9070 11 speed on Fabian Cancellara’s Trek Domane

In addition to the multiple satellite shifter options, you can hold down a button for multiple shifts – a feature not available on the first 7970version of Di2 – and even set the speed for those multi-shifts between one of five settings.

Finally, you can program which button does what. Want your left shifter to control the rear derailleur? No problem. For time trial and triathlon bikes, remote shift options include two buttons on each pod, or, if you don’t think you’ll take it out of the big ring much, one button for upshifting the rear on the left and one button for downshifting on the right. Or vice versa – they’re just buttons.
The sprint shift button is a tiny protrusion just below the hood: the sprint shift button is a tiny protrusion just below the hood

The tiny sprint shifter can be set to control either derailleur

Shimano has new software that allows riders to program all of this at home, if you are a PC owner. If you’re a Mac user – sorry, Charlie – you’ll have to take it to a shop. However, you can still trim the derailleurs without software, in the case of a wheel change with different spacing.

The luxury groupset shares a crankset, chain and brakes with the 9000 11-speed mechanical group but weighs 24g less. Total group weight is 2,047g, compared to 2,219g for the previous Dura-Ace Di2.

The 9070 derailleurs get a visual overhaul from the 7970 ones, with some slight weight savings, and the rear now accepts up to a 28T cassette.

The big weight savings compared to 7970 comes from the internal battery, with its minimal mounting hardware compared to the external battery. There’s still an external battery option for 9070, such as the one on our test Foil.

The 9070 levers have a more pronounced click when shifting, and you can set the new multi-shift mode for 2, 3 or ‘unlimited’ shifting: the 9070 levers have a more pronounced click when shifting, and you can set the new multi-shift mode for 2, 3 or ‘unlimited’ shifting

Multiple shifts with the hold of a button are also programmable

Shimano addressed one complaint about the 7970’s vague button feel with a more defined, audible click for each shift. Still, the button press is a light sensation, much softer than the definitive snap of Campagnolo’s electronic EPS system.

Ports – ports everywhere

Shimano wasn’t the first with a electronic group, of course. “Back in the 90s, Mavic had the vision to see that we’re going to need electronics on the bike,” said Shimano vice president Wayne Stetina, referring to the ahead-of-its-time Mavic Mektronic electronic group that never took root. “So why not put it all over the bike?”

The original Dura-Ace Di2 group didn’t allow for shifters all over the bike (nor does Campy’s current EPS). It had two ports on the shifters (one of which went back to the main system) and no junction box. It was a closed, wired system.

Now, 9070 is more modular. It has three ports at each shifter (one to plug into the main system, one for a sprint shifter and one for another accessory). Plus, you can get additional ports under the stem.

The new junction box, attached below the stem, comes in 3- and 5-port options: the new junction box, attached below the stem, comes in 3- and 5-port options

The junction box under the stem is plug-and-play for STI levers and optional extension shifters

The optional shifters include:

Sprint shifters: Small knobs that shift one direction; one configuration is one on the right drop and one on the left, controlling the down- and upshifting of the rear derailleur; these can only be plugged into the STI shifters, not the junction box
Climbing shifter: A two-button pod that shifts two directions; a common placement is under the handlebar near the stem, so you can shift with the thumb
TT/tri extension shifters: Two-button pods, one for each extension
Minimalist TT/tri extension shifter: Similar to sprint shifters, with one-way shift on each side; good for those who mostly race in the big ring

9070 works with any of four extension shifters: this is the two-directional climber switch: 9070 works with any of four extension shifters: this is the two-directional climber switch

The two-direction climbing switch is one of four extension options

Also, there’s an aero version of the Di2 STI levers for time trial and triathlon.

Shifting speed, audio/tactile feedback, convenience and performance

One of the most pleasantly surprising things about Di2 is how the motorized derailleurs shift up to a bigger cog or ring when you’re out of the saddle. On a mechanical group, you have to back off just a touch. In fact, the all-round experience is akin to an automatic transmission car – you can keep the pedal down continuously, regardless of what gear shifts are taking place.

One complaint against Di2 has been the vague feel of the buttons, which, combined with the close proximity of the buttons, can make shifting in thick gloves a bit comical – without a moving lever to feel in your hands, there was a loss of connectivity. Our one test ride was on a warm day, so we can’t say whether or not the subtle shape refinements improve this at all, but the buttons are still side by side.

With bare fingertips, however, you can clearly feel the difference between the smooth, concave, inner button and the dimpled, convex one. You can definitely feel the short throw (>1cm) and a click with each shift. There were no mis-shifts.

The heart of the drivetrain is the new, four-arm, 9000 crank, with a powerful 9070 front derailleur that can upshift under full power : the heart of the drivetrain is the new, four-arm, 9000 crank, with a powerful 9070 front derailleur that can upshift under full power

9070 shares a crank, chain and brake calipers with the new 9000 mechanical group

The new multi-shift function, previously an advantage for Campagnolo, is cool. Yes, you can just rapid-fire shift manually on electric and mechanical groups, but this option is easier.

Set on ‘infinite’, you can just hold the rear downshift button down as the derailleur glides across the cassette until the gear feels right, then take your finger off. Whether you choose very slow, slow, normal, fast or very fast in the multi-shift menu – on your PC, remember – this setting applies to all your extension shifters as well.

We rode with the sprint shifters placed just below the hoods, one on the inside of each drop. Using the right thumb to downshift the rear derailleur felt natural, a la Campagnolo, although the button is much easier to reach from the drops.

We’re eager to further test different placements of this tiny one-way shifter, including up on the top of the bar. Using the left thumb to upshift the rear derailleur wasn’t quite so natural at first – hey, old dog, new tricks here – but by the last half of a three-hour ride we were using it all the time. We found it very comfortable, convenient and honestly just fun to shift up and down the rear derailleur with both hands in the drops.

We haven’t tested the climber switch yet, but a few fellow riders said they appreciated being able to shift with their hands on the tops. One thing we definitely noticed – and appreciated – was that, when going hard, little things make a difference. Whether that difference is a true physical benefit or just a psychological one, minimizing what your hands are doing to shift when you’re hurting is a beautiful thing.

Speaking of little things, we appreciated having an eleventh cog, not for an ‘extra’ gear so much as for smaller steps between the entire range. When suffering on the wheel of a better man, small gear changes – made with minimal hand movement – took a bit of the edge off.

We were able to easily shift down with our right thumb and up with our left under full power: we were able to easily shift down with our right thumb and up with our left under full power

We could easily upshift with our left thumb and downshift with our right under full power

Shared with 9000 – brakes, crank, chain

As we’ve said, we test rode the system on a Scott Foil and Shimano’s new C24 clinchers (with aluminum brake tracks) down a tight and winding descent that dropped 4,000 vertical feet in 10 miles. Braking power, modulation and lever feel were excellent.

After descending on more squealing carbon wheels than we care to remember, Shimano’s mighty new dual-pivot calipers pushing on a metal brake surface was a relief. We could brake hard and late into corners, and easily feather the brakes as needed.

The new four-arm crank remains metal. While all its competitors have gone carbon at the top end of their ranges, the Japanese giant is staying the course with aluminum? Why? Fatigue strength, says Stetina. Shimano has incredibly strict fatigue tolerances, and until the company can produce a carbon crank that’s lighter, stiffer and has the same fatigue life as its aluminum cranks, it will proceed with metal.

Material choice aside, we love the new smaller bolt-diameter design, which eliminates the ‘standard or compact’ question. With this set you can run 53/39, 50/34 or, our favorite setup for riding in the mountains, the 52/36. Well played, Shimano.

Shifting with 9070 is akin to an automatic car, in that you can keep the gas on, no matter what the transmission is doing: shifting with 9070 is akin to an automatic car, in that you can keep the gas on, no matter what the transmission is doing

The new crank eliminates the ‘standard or compact’ question with a smaller bolt diameter

What’s missing?

On the whole this new group is phenomenal, but there are still a few things missing from what could be the ultimate road group. There’s no power meter, for one. While SRAM jumped that train with the purchase of Quarq, Shimano doesn’t make a power meter. You can, of course, use an SRM or a Stages Power, but why not integrate one of these into the group itself?

Also, the ANT+ Flight Deck computer announced last year isn’t a reality in this group. Yes, you can use a Garmin or something similar, and pair it with a third-party power meter, but why not put all this together in a computer that’s also talking with the electronic group?

Finally, as we type this review on a Mac, we have to point out that the PC-only configuration software is limiting. We’d like to see an app for iPhone and Android that works with 9070.

At the end of the day, though, 9070 represents a huge step forward in the man-machine interface. If you don’t intend to purchase it, you probably don’t want to test ride it – it’s quite addictive.

For more information on Shimano products see www.shimano.com.

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2013 Shimano revamped the SLX group

by on Jul.25, 2013, under Uncategorized

Component Description Part # Weight Price (US MSRP)
Crankset 2×10 38-24T 175mm FC-M675 745 grams $260
Bottom Bracket Normal – w/ cranks SM-BB71-41A 88 grams $40 – w/ cranks
Brakes front 1000mm line/rear 1200mm BL and BR-M675 602 grams $140 each
Rotors 180mm – 6 bolt SM-RT66 138 grams $30 each
Cassette 11-36 CS-HG81-10) 372 grams $85
Chain Directional CN-HG74 279 grams $45
Shifters Normal clamp SL-M670 295 grams $110
Front derailleur High Direct FD-M676-D 178 grams $55
Rear derailleur Shadow Plus GS RD-M675-GS 302 grams $100

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Shimano Unveils Hydraulic Road Discs with R785 Di2 System & 11-Speed Ultegra

by on Jul.01, 2013, under Uncategorized

posted by Zach Overholt – June 30, 2013 – 11am EDT

Ultegra 6870 Series group

After months of speculation, leaks, but little actual info, Shimano’s highly anticipated hydraulic road disc brake system is finally here. Oh, and there is a new 11 speed Ultegra Di2 group as well. At this point in the game, Shimano trickling down the new features from Dura Ace 9070 is just about a given, but there are some great updates to an already amazing system. I’ve been on an Ultegra 6770 Di2 equipped bike for the past few months, and riding is believing. With 6870 only promising to be better, the future is looking bright for Shimano electronics – and road discs.

Want more on Shimano’s first hydraulic road disc/Di2 system? Find it all with exclusive tech and insight directly from Shimano after the break!

Shimano R785 Hydraulic disc brake Di2 road

Shimano’s ST-R785 shifter and BR-R785 hydraulic disc brakes

Now for the reason you’re all here – Shimano’s R785 hydraulic system. While you may have been expecting to see a specific Ultegra branded system, the Ultegra-level system allows it to exist on its own, since it’s not a complete drivetrain. The beauty of the ST-R785 shifters and BR-R785 hydraulic disc brakes is that thanks to the E-Tube wiring system, the R785 group can be added to any E-tube equipped Di2 group. That means Dura Ace 9070, new 11 speed Ultegra 6870, and 10 speed Ultegra 6770. We asked Shimano Road Product Manager Dave Lawrence about the cross compatibility, and he said since the rear derailleur essentially tells the shifter what to do, the ST-R785s are basically plug and play for any E-Tube system. He did mention that older 6770 systems that have not been updated recently may need a firmware update, but other than that they will all work together.
Shimano Ultegra Di2 vs r785 Shifters

ST-R785 Shifter on the left, Shimano Ultegra 6870 Shifter on the right.

The same goes for upgrading a 6770 10 speed Di2 group to 11 speed – the drivetrain would need to be replaced, but you could keep the 6770 shifters as they will be compatible with the 6870 parts. Of course if you go that route you will miss out on the addition of a 3rd port on the shifter for use with the SW-R610 sprinter shifters. Shimano has also continued to improve the ergonomics on the 6870 shifter with easier access to the shifter buttons, and increased contrast in texture between the two buttons. Like Dura Ace 9070, the 6870 shifter can be customized with variable multi-shift speed and shift count when you hold down the button in addition to firmware updates rolling out in the future.

Side by side, perhaps one of the best features of the ST-r785 is how similar it is to a standard Di2 lever in size and shape. Thanks to the relatively tiny internals for an electronic vs. mechanical shifter, there is plenty of room for the hydraulic master cylinder. The result is a shifter without any additional girth in order to squeeze in the hydraulics. Built into the ST-R785 lever are also reach and free stroke adjustments allowing riders to dial in the perfect position and obtain more braking power from the hood.

BR-R785_with_RT99-S

One of the big questions on everyone’s mind when it comes to Shimano’s road discs will likely be – what about the heat? According to Shimano, for them – it’s a non issue. Boldly showing their confidence in their technology, Shimano is recommending 140mm rotors front and rear for the road, regardless of weight – as long as you are using the SM-RT99 IceTech Rotors and Ice Tech finned pads. The rotors are identical to the rotors recently launched with the new XTR brakes, that were initially developed for Saint brakes. These rotors use the IceTech aluminum core clad in stainless steel, but take it a step further with the aluminum core flowing out into the center of the rotor in the form of “Freeza”cooling fins that help to further radiate heat. Shimano points out that the finned brake pads can reduce heat build up by 50° with another incredible 150° of cooling offered from the RT99 rotor compared to a standard steel rotor. While 140mm rotors are recommended front and rear, SM-RT99s will be offered in 140, and 160mm.

When asked what allowed Shimano to be so confident in the heat management of such small rotors, Lawrence stated it’s due to all of the research and development of the IceTech system from the mountain bike side of the business. “Our knowledge of heat management from mountain bikes is what allowed us to create this system,” said Lawrence. In fact, when asked if the BR-R785 was developed specifically for road bikes, we were told it was essentially a re-purposed mountain bike brake caliper that has been tuned for road use. That means the aluminum caliper uses the same brake pads as most of the current two piston Shimano mountain bike brakes offering consumers easily available replacement pads.

The other great news for the system is that it uses all of the same hose fittings as current hydraulic systems and is bled with the same method as well. Hoses will attach to the levers with the standard Shimano olive and barb with a threaded barrel, and the bleed system uses the Shimano bleed funnel at the lever with a syringe at the caliper. According to Lawrence, “The First prototypes actually had a different bleed process. But going into the road side of things, we knew some shops are road specific so they may not have as much experience with disc brakes. Realizing that meant having a consistent bleed process across the board was important.”
Shimano Rt99 Rotors Road Disc

IceTech SM-RT99 Centerlock Rotors

Since Shimano requires the use of the SM-RT99 rotors to guarantee proper heat management, that also means users will be forced into Centerlock rotors as the RT99 is not offered in 6 bolt. In order to provide something to roll on, launching along with the BR785s will be a set of 11 speed compatible Centerlock hubs and wheelset. The HB-CX75 hubs will be offered in 28 hole drilling, are 11 speed compatible, and can accommodate a 140mm rotor.

The Wh-RX31 Centerlock disc wheelset is specified for road and cyclocross use and are standard clinchers with a slightly wider 17mm internal width for better suiting wider tires. Both the hubs and wheels will be available in 135mm rear hubs only. We asked if more wheels and hubs were in the pipeline and Dave said there would be higher end options introduced in the near future along with companies other than Shimano working on compatible wheels and hubs.

Shimano Ultegra Di2 11 speed Derailleurs

Almost overshadowed by the hydraulic discs, the new 11 speed Ultegra Di2 includes the expected extra gear, but also drops a total of 126g and adds some new features as well. One of the most welcome is a redesigned rear derailleur that has a wider link for better shifting and is offered in a mid-cage GS version which will allow up to a 32t rear cog – a first for Di2. Combined with the new Ultegra 4 arm crank that was unveiled with the 11 speed mechanical group, the 6870 group offers a wide range of gearing so almost all riders can find the perfect set up. Cranksets can be configured in 53-39, 52-36, 50-34, and now 46-36 for cyclocross.

6870′s E-Tube wiring system is also updated to offer a cleaner install while making the addition of satellite shifters and special programming easier.

Shimano Sprint Shifter SW-R610 SW-R671-R_L

As mentioned, the new ST-6870 shifter now has three ports that will accommodate the additional Sprinter shifter and satellite shifter. The SW-R610 Sprinter shifter is not compatible with 10 speed Ultegra levers. The other big news for Ultegra 6870 is the introduction of the ST-6871 or Ultegra specific TT shift/brake levers. The brake lever shifters aren’t pictured, but the system offers the same multi-position shifting and braking while maintaining E-tube functionality.
Weights:

In order to drop the 126g over 6770 Di2, you will need to use the internal battery for the system, for a combined total weight of 2359g. Otherwise, with the external battery the 6870 Di2 system is only 69g lighter but hey, lighter weight and another gear is good, right? 6870 is also 9g lighter than 6800 mechanical with the internal battery. Weights are with an 11-23 cassette, 114 link chain, and a 170mm 53-39 crankset.

As for the R785 system, the complete system including shifters, brakes, hoses, mineral oil, and two RT-99 rotors works out to be 1066g. Compared to 6870 shifters with rim brakes, the hydraulic system adds less than a pound – somewhere around 340g.

R785 Weights:

ST-­R785 – 515g
BR-R785 – 263g
Brake Hose (BH59) – 61.5g
Mineral Oil – 21.5g
Rotor – RT-99 (140mm) – 205g

Availability:

Availability for all all parts is expected in November with Shimano holding off on setting pricing due to possible fluctuations in the exchange rate between now and then. Until then, Shimano’s sponsored athletes will continue testing, but you can probably expect to see the new R785 system on a cyclocross course near you, this fall.

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Shimano unveil Ultegra 6800 groupset – 11 speeds and lots of Dura Ace trickle-down

by on Apr.30, 2013, under Uncategorized

by Dave Atkinson, April 30, 2013
Shimano have launched a brand new Ultegra groupset, 6800. The new gear contains masses of trickle-down from Dura Ace 9000. Grabbing the headlines will be addition of an extra cog to give 11 speeds at the rear, but the improvements to the shifting and braking performance are more worthy of note.

“Ultegra normally takes the latest technology from Dura Ace and provides it at a much more competitive price”, Shimano’s Mark Greshon told us. “It’s for real world riders who want good performance.” Certainly Ultegra has been a staple groupset for privateer racers and keen sportivistes for many years, offering much of the functionality of the top-end transmission components. Dura Ace jumped ahead last year with the release of the 9000 groupset, but Ultegra is back snapping at its heels now.

“Ultegra uses technology that’s been proven in WorldTour races, proven at the highest level”, said Mark. However, Shimano are aware that not everyone riding Ultegra has racing ambitions. All day comfort is important, and there’s a large percentage of Ultegra riders who spend most of their time riding on the hoods. Shimano have been thinking about comfort, and braking and shifting performance predominantly from that riding position. The lever stroke is shorter than before, and lighter too, meaning less shifting effort, and like Dura Ace 9000 the new drivetrain evens out the force required across the cassette, meaning that shifting in the low gears is as easy as it is at the bottom of the cassette; vivid indexing, Shimano call that.

Hood shape is borrowed from Dura Ace mechanical, which in turn took its cues from the Di2 lever. It’s a lot slimmer than before which Shimano say gives better grip and comfort; certainly Mat was a fan when he tested Dura Ace. “I’ve got large hands and I find the reduced size to be an advantage”, he said. “People with smaller hands are likely to notice it even more”. The brake lever is carbon, as it was on the mechanical version of the last Ultegra groupset. The Di2 version was alloy.

The front derailleur has seen a significant change in design. It now features a support bolt, like Di2, that comes into contact with the frame to stiffen things up. The pull arm is much longer, like Dura Ace, to reduce shift effort.

The rear mech comes in short- and mid-cage incarnations; you’ll need the longer mech if you plan to run 32 teeth at the rear, which is the largest cog it’s designed to handle. Again, it takes technology from Dura Ace 9000 down to the next level, with the more linear spring rate for more equal shifting across the block. Both mechs are designed to work best with Shimano’s new polymer-coated gear cables.

For braking there’s the new symmetrical dual pivot design, ported from Dura Ace 9000. Instead of using the brake mount as one of the pivots the calliper has two independent pivots equally spaced on either side of the brake. Polymer-coated cables reduce friction and increase the amount of power for a given force at the lever. The upshot of these improvements is that Shimano claim a 10% increase in braking power over Ultegra 6700.

There’s a direct mount version of the brake available that does away with the central mounting bolt and instead bolts directly to the frame at either side, which is better for stiffness; quite a few frame manufacturers are already adopting the standard.

Mat called out the performance of the new Dura Ace callipers as a highlight of the new 9000-series kit. “The amount of bite on offer is one of the best features of the entire groupset, and it’s incredibly easy to apply – you require very little effort through your fingers”, he said. “And the more powerful the braking, the longer you can safely leave it”. Hopefully the Ultegra 6800 callipers will be just as capable.

Rider Tuned is how Shimano describe the available gearing options. “The groupset has been designed to be as efficient as possible, so that all your energy goes into moving the bike forwards”, Mark told us. We’re pretty sure that’s always been their policy though.

Bascially you can have anything from a full-on race setup with a standard chainset and a straight-through cassette, to a compact and a wide-ratio block at the back. 53/39 and 50/34 chainsets are available of course, but there’s also a middle-ground 52/36 option which was introduced on Dura Ace last year and is sure to appeal to anyone that wants to look like they’re sporting a standard setup but could do with some help on the hills. Pretty much everyone, then. There’s a 46/36 cyclocross-friendly option too. There’s no triple chainset at the moment, but one is in development.

The chainset has the new four-arm design from Dura Ace, which is designed to maintain stiffness but reduce weight by moving the arms to cope with the different forces at different parts of the pedal stroke. It’ll spin on a redesigned bottom bracket that shaves 14g off the old Ultegra one.

The cassette is available in 11-23, 11-25, 12-25, 11-28 and 11-32 configurations. The additional sprocket means that the cassette is straight through for a bit longer, so generally that’s the addition of an 18T cog over ten speed. The new wider cassette means a new Ultegra wheel too, the WH-6800. This wheelset features a tubeless-ready rim, wide-flange hubset and tool-free hub adjustment system, as well as the wider 11-speed freehub, designed to take the extra torque possible from a 32T rear cog. A tubular version of the wheel will also be available and they’re all hand-built in Shimano’s own factory.

The chain is redesigned for 11-speeds; it’s symmetrical so you don’t have to worry about which way round you fit it, which is good as we always got that wrong. It also features a PTFE coating, called Sil-Tec, for increased durability.

The Ultegra pedals are unchanged, save for a cosmetic update.

We saw the groupset a few months back, and also got to have a quick play on the prototype shifters and mechs. It quite literally was a spin round the car park, so not enough to get a proper feel for the groupset, although first impressions were positive. We’ll be getting in a production version just as soon as we can.

The published weights for the groupset are as follows:

Shifters ST-6800 (set): 425 Gram
Rear derailleur RD-6800 (SS):195 Gram
Rear derailleur RD-6800 (GS): 207 Gram
Front derailleur FD-6800 (brazed type): 89 Gram
Front derailleur FD-6800 (band type, size Loser: 104 Gram
Chainset FC-6800 (53-39T with BB): 765 Gram
Cassette CS-6800 (11-23T): 212 Gram
Chain CN-6800 (114L): 253 Gram
Bottom Bracket SM-BB72: 63 Gram

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My New Giro Empire Shoes, Happy Birthday ;-)

by on Apr.29, 2013, under Uncategorized

IMG 0516 300x225 My New Giro Empire Shoes, Happy Birthday ; )

My New Giro Empire Shoes, Happy Birthday 😉

IMG 0517 300x225 My New Giro Empire Shoes, Happy Birthday ; )

My New Giro Empire Shoes, Happy Birthday 😉

IMG 0520 300x225 My New Giro Empire Shoes, Happy Birthday ; )

My New Giro Empire Shoes, Happy Birthday 😉

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